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Yeast buckwheat pancakes

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recipe for yeast pancakes
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    There’s already quite a collection of different recipe for yeast pancakes on the blog: butter, cream, beer, sourdough, chocolate and even gluten-free. All that was missing was yeast pancakes and finally I made them. I should have waited so long! These pancakes taste very different from the rest and are definitely worth you trying.

    After a post by professional baker Oksana Kuznetsova on Instagram about the peculiarities of working with yeast dough, I did not search for the recipe, but simply deduced it myself, specifying a couple of technological points. I’m sure you could easily do that too if you read on.

    Oksana has once completely changed my idea of yeast and proper technique of kneading and making dough, regular readers will remember this story by the example of an updated recipe for a loaf. I have trusted her opinion ever since.

    Peculiarities of making yeast pancakes

    Generally speaking, all the recommendations that I gave in the article “Recipe for yeast pancakes” with its secrets and error analysis are true for these pancakes. Except that yeast pancakes are usually fried at a higher temperature in a pan with a thicker bottom. However, my favourite, the Rondell Mocco, managed without a hitch too.

    I really wanted to give a version with the minimum amount of yeast, but realising that few people would want to repeat it, I took the maximum allowed. If you are prepared to spend more time for the sake of better quality pancakes, I suggest using 1-1.5% of the weight of the flour and baking the batter in the fridge.

    Prolonged cold fermentation greatly enriches the flavour and aroma. This is also helped by the sourdough method and adding the muffins to the sourdough, not to the final dough.

    If you don’t have much time, you don’t have to make the sourdough, but you don’t have to increase the amount of yeast – it’s not good or tasty.

    Yeast pancakes with buckwheat flour

    Very flavourful thin yeast pancakes made with a mixture of wheat and buckwheat flour.

    Ingredients

    Stuffing
    • 240 g milk
    • 15 g of live yeast
    • 15 g sugar
    • 100 g whole wheat flour
    • 50 g buckwheat flour
    • 150 g eggs
    • 100 g melted butter
    Dough
    • 100 g whole wheat flour
    • 50 g buckwheat flour
    • 3 g salt
    • 160 g milk
    • 450 g boiling water
    Instructions
    1. Prepare the sourdough. Stir in the eggs with a whisk. In a mixing bowl, combine both types of flour and sift them together.
    2. Dissolve yeast in milk. Add sugar and both types of flour. Stir well.
      Stir in the eggs and butter. Until the volume has doubled, cover the pan with cling film.
    3. Sift salt and flour together to prepare the dough.
    4. When the flour is added to the starter, mix it well. Then pour the milk into it.
    5. Then cover it again with cling film and leave it to rise again until the volume has doubled.
    6. As soon as the dough begins to sink, stir it well and leave to rise for 30 minutes.
    7. Heat a frying pan on a high heat. Grease with butter.
    8. Dilute the batter with boiling water. It is better not to add all the amount mentioned in the recipe at once, but do it gradually, checking how thin and elastic the pancakes are.
    9. Fry on both sides until golden brown.
    Recipe notes
    1. Live yeast can be substituted for the dry yeast by dividing the amount by 3.
    2. You can reduce the amount of live yeast to 1% of the weight of the flour. The dough will then take considerably longer to mature, preferably in the refrigerator.
    3. if making pancakes with 100% extra virgin wheat flour, the amount of liquid must be reduced. The easiest way to do this is with water rather than milk.
    4. To illustrate, the photo shows pancakes fried on 7 of 9 possible modes (the top two on the round plate) and 9 of 9 (the ones below them). Both come off well, differing only in colour and very slightly in flavour intensity. Temperatures below are not suitable.

    Bon appetit!

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